michael-urban-headshotCarleton University’s Canadian Foreign Policy Journal (CFPJ) has awarded Michael Urban of the Mowat Centre, the Best Paper Prize for his piece A Fearful Asymmetry: Diefenbaker, the Canadian Military and Trust During the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Urban’s article is available for download on the journals’ affiliate website: www.iaffairscanada.com.

Urban’s article focuses on the role of trust in international relations and foreign policy analysis, and uses this idea to account for differences between Prime Minister Diefenbaker and that of the Canadian military during the Cuban missile crisis.

The award carries a $500 prize. Past winners include Stéphane Roussel, Daryl Copeland, Kim Nossal, Susan Henders and Mary Young, David Gordon and Christian Leuprecht.

The prize is awarded annually for the best article published in CFPJ. Each contribution is eligible for consideration and the CFPJ’s editorial and international advisory board judge the articles based on scholarship, contribution to knowledge and debate, writing style and audience accessibility.

This year two runners up were also selected. Carolyn John and Adam Thorn of Ryerson University, for their piece on subnational diplomacy in the Great Lakes region and University of Ottawa’s Rebecca Tiessen and Krystel Carrier for their article on the erasure of gender in Canadian foreign policy under the Harper Conservatives.

About the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal

CFPJ is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal published three times a year by the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA) at Carleton University. Established in 1992, CFPJ is now Canada’s leading journal of international affairs. The journal’s international advisory and editorial boards reflect diverse political, disciplinary and professional perspectives. Contributors are drawn from Canada and around the world. Essays are fully referenced, peer-reviewed, authoritative yet written for the specialist and non-specialist alike.  Its readers include government officials, academics, students of international affairs, journalists, NGOs and the private sector. Details regarding submitting articles commentaries and review essays to the Journal can be found here:http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcfp20/current

About Michael Urban

Michael Crawford Urban is a policy associate at the Mowat Centre, an independent public policy think tank affiliated with the University of Toronto’s School of Public Policy and Governance. He is simultaneously a visiting fellow at the University of Toronto’s Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History. He has also worked as the returning officer for the federal riding of Spadina-Fort York in the 2015 federal election and with the Policy Research Division at Global Affairs Canada.

Urban holds a doctorate in International Relations from Balliol College, University of Oxford. In addition to trust and liberal democracy, his research interests include international relations theory, Canadian foreign policy, nuclear weapons and proliferation, and European integration.

Urban is the recipient of numerous awards, including a Rhodes scholarship, a Cadieux-Léger Fellowship, and a SSHRC doctoral fellowship. In addition to Oxford, he holds degrees from the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University and Queen’s University.

For More Information
David Carment
Editor, Canadian Foreign Policy Journal
Professor, NPSIA, Carleton University
david_carment@carleton.ca

Joseph Landry
Managing editor, Canadian Foreign Policy Journal
joseph.landry@carleton.ca

Media Contact
Steven Reid
Media Relations Officer
Carleton University
613-520-2600 ext. 8718
613-265-6613
Steven_Reid3@Carleton.ca 

 

Image courtesy of Wikimedia

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